McLaren Forms Its Own Team for Indy; Some Thoughts

Following yesterday’s late afternoon announcement that McLaren and Fernando Alonso will enter the 2019 Indianapolis 500, CEO Zak Brown added further details. The Mclaren effort will be a separate team, McLaren Racing. It is expected they will still receive some support from Andretti Autosport.  The team will run Chevrolet engines in all likelihood.

Brown would not comment on a possible two car effort at Indy. He did say that this entry is a precursor to a full time Indycar team.

Some Thoughts

It’s always great to have more cars in the 500, especially with another separate team. The international aspect is great for the race.

The possibility exists to have six former F1 drivers on the 500 grid, including a former world champion. Maybe Team Penske can bring Juan Pablo Montoya back as well.

Alonso will drive a car very different from the one he drove in 2017. There will be less downforce. I have no doubt he will adjust quickly as he did in his first May.

If McLaren’s main focus is helping Alonso win the third leg of the Triple Crown, would it be helpful for them to enter Pocono as well in 2019? While it is a different track from Indy, it is still a high speed track of the same length.

Andretti Autosport will be giving support to two Chevrolet teams, Harding and McLaren, during May. I don’t think that is a good idea for the series.  Even if their personnel are completely removed from engine discussions, it just looks bad.

The entry list for the 103rd running of the Indianapolis 500 appears to be heading to about 38 cars. I will wait until late April to begin my annual plea to change the qualifying format.

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McLaren, Alonso Will Enter the Indianapolis 500

Zak Brown, CEO of McLaren, confirmed last night the team’s entry in th e 104th running of the Indianapolis 500. Fernando Alonso will drive for McLaren .

No announcement concerning which engine the team will use or what full time team, if a nylon, they will partner with.

In 2017 Alonso drove in the 500 for McLaren, who partnered with Andretti Autosport. He led 29 laps before dropping out with engine failure. Alonso earned Rookie of the Year for his efforts.

Still no word about other races for 2019 for McLaren or Alonso.

More details later tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

Updated: McLaren Not Coming to Indycar in 2019; Indy 500 Undecided

Photo: Fernando Alonso at the 2017 Indianapolis 500

Zak Brown, CEO of McLaren, confirmed today that McLaren will not have a full time entry in Indycar in 2019. He left open the possibility of McLaren still entering the 103rd running of the Indianapolis 500 in May.

“As far as the Indy 500 is concerned, it’s something that remains of interest to us,” Brown said. “That’ll be a decision that ultimately we take in the off-season, and it’s something Fernando would like to do. Right now, we’re still focused on Formula 1, and until we get a little bit of fresh air, we’ll remain focused on that.”

In 2017, McLaren ran the 500 in partnership with Andretti Autosport. COO Rob edwards of Andretti confirmed that the team will run one or two extra cars for the 500. McLaren might run with them if they can iron out their differences with Honda.

Fernando Alonso has yet to indicate what races he wants to run next year. He is committed to the full WEC season with Toyota. Their only conflicting  date with Indycar is labor Day when Indycar is at Portland.

The Formula 1 season ends November 25. A decision may come in December, but January I think is more likely.

This decision should not be a shock to anyone. Talk of McLaren running next season has quieted down since June. There will still still be at least one more car on the grid full time with Harding having two cars. Ten to twelve races should have even larger fields.

Some Off Season Thoughts

The first week of the off season brought the exciting news that Harding racing will partner with Steinbrenner Racing in 2019. The new Harding Steinbrenner Racing team has signed rookies Pato O’Ward, 2018 Indy Lights champion, and Indy lights runner-up Colton Herta. Very few details other than the driver announcements are known at this time. There is a technical partnership with Andretti Autosport which will provide shocks, dampers, and engineering help.

The big question is which engine will Harding Steinbrenner use? Harding had Chevrolet power in 2018, and Andretti is a Honda team. For these teams to work together, the engine needs to be the same. If HSR goes with Honda, would that rule out a possible third car at Rahal letterman Lanigan Racing?

One of the greatest things about this new team is that the two team owners come from outside of racing. My friend Steve Wittich wrote an excellent article for Trackside Online about how Indycar needs diversity in its ownership. I hope we see more owners from outside racing. they should provide a fresh perspective on the business of racing.  You can find his article on Trackside Online.com. It is a site worth subscribing to.

New Title Sponsor?

There has been no word on a new series title sponsor. Things have gone rather quiet about who it will be. That could mean it’s wrapped up ready to be announced, or Indycar is still searching. It would have been good to have an announcement at Sonoma, and have some sort of handing over ceremony to thank Verizon for their sponsorship.

The Mysterious Third OEM

Is there someone ready to jump in for 2021? There has been some talk of one or two manufacturers, with one name mentioned more than others, but again, things seem very quiet on the new engine front right now.

McLaren News in November?

We may not know Mclaren’s plans until November. It would be great to have McLaren in Indycar, but this is turning into racing’s version of General Hospital. First Honda says they will not help Mclaren, then reports have come out saying yes they still might. Alonso has not made a decision. My guess he is in for the 500 only. Stoffel Vandoorne, considered a candidate for the seat when Alonso doesn’t drive, is rumored to be close to having a contract in Formula E. That could mean McLaren will be here for the 500 only as well.   Stay tuned.

Coyne’s Car 19

Dale Coyne has talked to some former Formula 1 drivers about driving the 19 car next year. he continues his quest to have one driver for the entire season in that ride. Apparently neither Zachary Claman De Melo or Pietro Fittipaldi will return. Too bad. They both have some potential to be decent drivers.

October Coming Attractions

Next month I have several columns planned for here and on Wildfire Sports.

A review of Born Racer.

A book review of Gentleman, Start Your Engines.

Look for  another month of May review via the official program for that year.

Commentary on off season news and the big announcements that could be coming will be posted as needed. In addition to a title sponsor, I am most interested to see which races will be on NBC network. I’m guessing there will be a lot in May and very early June. They didn’t ask me (again) but I think one Detroit race would be enough.

Look for a column on things Indycar might want to change for 2019.

Alonso Leaves F1; Next Stop Indycar?

Above: Fernando Alonso at the 2017 Indianapolis 500

Two time F1 World Champion Fernando Alonso announced this morning he will leave Formula 1 in 2019. The announcement comes a day after Scott Dixon signed a new multi-year deal with Chip Ganassi Racing. It ends months of speculation about Alonso’s future plans. He will likely continue to drive in WEC events next year and is assumed to be participating in the 103rd running of the Indianapolis 500, if not the entire Indycar season. In 2018, there were no conflicting dates between WEC and Indycar.

Alonso has driven for McLaren in Formula 1 since 2015 after failing to win a third title with Ferrari. He won World Championship titles in 2005 and 2006 driving for Renault. Alonso began his F1 career in 2001 with Minardi. McLaren struggled with a Honda engine for two years before switching to Renault power this season. Results have been slightly better.

Today’s retirement from F1 announcement gave no hint of Alonso’s future plans, but indications are McLaren is pursuing an Indycar program for 2019 with Alonso and another driver. McLaren will partner with another team, thought to be Andretti Autosport, whom Alonso drove for in 2017 at the 500, but there is some talk that McLaren may be looking at a Chevy team. Ed Carpenter Racing has been mentioned as a possibility.

What is the impact of Alonso in Indycar? The series would gain some prestige having a former fairly recent champion on the grid. The worldwide viewing audience will likely increase, although his presence may not do much for the U.S. viewership. Alonso would become the fourth former F1 driver in Indycar, joining Takuma Sato, Sebastien Bourdais, Max Chilton, and Alexander Rossi. In 2012 Indycar also had four former F1 drivers- Rubens Barrichello, Justin Wilson, Sebastien Bourdais, and Takuma Sato.

A possible scenario for Alonso is select Indycar races and a full WEC schedule. Another is that he does both series full time, possibly working in the Daytona 500 as well. But we are getting way ahead of ourselves. He does not at this moment have an Indycar ride. That is the next step before we know where he will race.

The 2019 Indianapolis 500: A Fan’s Dream?

Imagine the race next year featuring Alonso, Tony Stewart, Helio Castroneves, plus all the current veterans and up and coming stars in Indycar. Prior to the race we could see a crazy Bump Day, I expect a bigger entry list next year. It could be one of the best Mays in a long time.

Pocono Update

Harding Racing has changed plans for the ABC Supply 500 at Pocono this weekend. Conor Daly will be in the car instead of Zachary Claman DeMelo as was announced yesterday. Daly has driven at Pocono twice. Claman DeMelo is slated to take over the car at Gateway and Portland. A current Indy Lights driver may drive the 88 at Sonoma. This means Gabby Chaves will not return to the schedule this year.

Sage Karam hoped to get enough funding to drive in his home race Sunday, but has run out of time. He hopes to be able to land a ride for Gateway the following weekend.

Look for my Pocono preview on Wildfire Sports Friday.

 

Dixon Stays Home

Scott Dixon has signed a multi-year deal to remain at Chip  Ganassi Racing. Dixon had considered an offer from McLaren and also had drawn interest from Team Penske, Andretti Autosport, and another team. 2019 will be Dixon’s 18th season at Ganassi, the longest any driver has been with the team. he made his 300th Indycar start at Mid Ohio July 29. Dixon began his Indycar career with PacWest Racing in Champ Car in 2001, then moved to Ganassi for the 2002 season.

Dixon has 44 career wins, third on the all time list behind A. J. Foyt (67) and Mario Andretti (52). While the length of the contract isn’t known at this time, he should have time to catch Andretti. Dixon currently leads this year’s points, holding a 46 point lead over Alexander Rossi with four races remaining. Winning the the title would be Dixon’s fifth, just two behind Foyt.

Rob Edwards, COO of Andretti Autosport, expressed disappointment but not surprise at the announcement. ” Probably some of the other conversations took too long to come together to the point where Scott needed to make a decision,” he said.

In this afternoons’ teleconference, both Dixon and Ganassi gave a glimpse of how the new deal came about. Dixon talked to Ganassi about a month ago and Dixon told his car owner that they were okay.  He conceded there were “moderate discussions going on” with other teams, but in the end, it was “a fairly straightforward decision.”

“These people gave me the opportunity to start with,” Dixon said.

As for the championship race this season, his approach is to “take each weekend as it is. The worst thing you can do is points racing.” Dixon hopes the missed opportunities at the beginning of the year don’t reflect at the end of the season.

Ganassi thinks Dixon is driving as well in 2018 as he has in his career.

“It was easier for Scott with teammates Dario Franchitti and Dan Wheldon. It’s tougher now without a champion driver on the team.”

Ganassi said he has no plans to expand the team beyond its current two cars.

Talking about the ABC Supply 500 at Pocono this weekend, Dixon said the new front wing configuration “gives everybody more options,” but will not “fundamentally change things.”

He went on to say he thinks the race will be “similar to last year.”

Dixon said, “I like this year’s style of racing better. ”

On the health of the series, Ganassi said, “It’s in a period where it’s on the uptick,” noting that he has seen Indycar go through up and down cycles. He is very excited about the NBC package.

Dixon added that his PNC sponsorship “speaks volumes about Indycar racing.”

Dixon staying with Chip ganassi racing is also a positive for the series.

Thoughts:

Seeing Dixon at any other team would just not feel right.

I wonder how much sponsor PNC Bank influenced the decision.

Staying with Ganassi means if he wins the title, we likely won’t see a number 1 car next year. Ganassi has been reluctant to have that number on his championship cars. can PNC help here? I think the champion should carry the number 1 the following year.

Some late news items:

Zachary Claman de Melo will drive for Harding Racing at Pocono and Gateway. DeMelo, who drove earlier in the season for Dale Coyne Racing’s shared number 19 car, takes over the 88 car as the team seeks to audition drivers for 2019.

Richmond is looking more likely as the oval to be added to next year’s schedule.

fernando Alonso is making an announcement tomorrow. Is Indycar involved? I may be up late tonight waiting to hear.

 

 

Dixon Stays Home

Scott Dixon has signed a multi-year deal to remain at Chip  Ganassi Racing. Dixon had considered an offer from McLaren and also had drawn interest from Team Penske, Andretti Autosport, and another team. 2019 will be Dixon’s 18th season at Ganassi, the longest any driver has been with the team. he made his 300th Indycar start at Mid Ohio July 29. Dixon began his Indycar career with PacWest Racing in Champ Car in 2001, then moved to Ganassi for the 2002 season.

Dixon has 44 career wins, third on the all time list behind A. J. Foyt (67) and Mario Andretti (52). While the length of the contract isn’t known at this time, he should have time to catch Andretti. Dixon currently leads this year’s points, holding a 46 point lead over Alexander Rossi with four races remaining. Winning the the title would be Dixon’s fifth, just two behind Foyt.

Rob Edwards, COO of Andretti Autosport, expressed disappointment but not surprise at the announcement. ” Probably some of the other conversations took too long to come together to the point where Scott needed to make a decision,” he said.

In this afternoons’ teleconference, both Dixon and Ganassi gave a glimpse of how the new deal came about. Dixon talked to Ganassi about a month ago and Dixon told his car owner that they were okay.  He conceded there were “moderate discussions going on” with other teams, but in the end, it was “a fairly straightforward decision.”

“These people gave me the opportunity to start with,” Dixon said.

As for the championship race this season, his approach is to “take each weekend as it is. The worst thing you can do is points racing.” Dixon hopes the missed opportunities at the beginning of the year don’t reflect at the end of the season.

Ganassi thinks Dixon is driving as well in 2018 as he has in his career.

“It was easier for Scott with teammates Dario Franchitti and Dan Wheldon. It’s tougher now without a champion driver on the team.”

Ganassi said he has no plans to expand the team beyond its current two cars.

Talking about the ABC Supply 500 at Pocono this weekend, Dixon said the new front wing configuration “gives everybody more options,” but will not “fundamentally change things.”

He went on to say he thinks the race will be “similar to last year.”

Dixon said, “I like this year’s style of racing better. ”

On the health of the series, Ganassi said, “It’s in a period where it’s on the uptick,” noting that he has seen Indycar go through up and down cycles. He is very excited about the NBC package.

Dixon added that his PNC sponsorship “speaks volumes about Indycar racing.”

Dixon staying with Chip ganassi racing is also a positive for the series.

Thoughts:

Seeing Dixon at any other team would just not feel right.

I wonder how much sponsor PNC Bank influenced the decision.

Staying with Ganassi means if he wins the title, we likely won’t see a number 1 car next year. Ganassi has been reluctant to have that number on his championship cars. can PNC help here? I think the champion should carry the number 1 the following year.

Some late news items:

Zachary Claman de Melo will drive for Harding Racing at Pocono and Gateway. DeMelo, who drove earlier in the season for Dale Coyne Racing’s shared number 19 car, takes over the 88 car as the team seeks to audition drivers for 2019.

Richmond is looking more likely as the oval to be added to next year’s schedule.

fernando Alonso is making an announcement tomorrow. Is Indycar involved? I may be up late tonight waiting to hear.